Other Works

Other Works


 

“Studio 360” for The New Yorker

The pioneers who are making the first virtual-reality narratives.

Janicza Bravo makes short films about loneliness. In one, Michael Cera plays an abrasive paraplegic who can’t get lucky. In another, Gaby Hoffmann plays a phone stalker for whom the description “comes on too strong” is not strong enough…

“Ready for Prime Time” for The New Yorker

After twenty-five years as a road comic, Leslie Jones becomes a star.

On TV talk shows, the host introduces a guest, then music plays while the guest emerges from backstage. On podcasts, the etiquette is still being worked out. The host often launches into an introduction while the guest sits quietly in the same sound booth…

“Why the Galápagos's Greatest Strength May Soon Be Its Downfall” for Condé Nast Traveler

These are anxious days in what’s become, for better or worse, one of the most storied ecosystems on earth.

Nature is Ecuador's brand. Even its flag features a distracting array of biodiversity: laurel and olive branches, Mount Chimborazo, and the Guayas River, all overseen by a slightly dopey-looking condor…

 
 

“How to Feel Like a Castaway” for The New York Times Style Magazine

When Alvaro Cerezo, a Spaniard with an unslakable wanderlust and a sun-bleached man bun, dedicated his life to exploring the remotest islands on Earth, he could not have predicted how many hours he would have to spend indoors, making uneasy small talk with local authority figures across Southeast Asia…

 
 

“Is This Any Way for a Spartan to Behave?” for Men’s Journal

Nature is Ecuador's brand. Even its flag features a distracting array of biodiversity: laurel and olive branches, Mount Chimborazo, and the Guayas River, all overseen by a slightly dopey-looking condor…

 
 

“Old School” for The New Yorker

The d.j. Peter Rosenberg, hip-hop’s reigning purist.

One of the most influential hosts on hip-hop radio is a man named Peter Rosenberg. He is thirty-four years old and stocky, with a few days of stubble and a you-can’t-fire-me-I-quit approach to baldness…

 
 

“Unreality Star” for The New Yorker

The paranoid used to fear the C.I.A. Now their delusions mirror “The Truman Show.”

Soon after Nick Lotz enrolled at Ohio University, in the fall of 2007, he grew deeply anxious. He was overweight, and self-conscious around women; worse, he thought that everyone sensed his unease. People who once seemed like new friends gradually stopped returning his texts…

 
 

“A Rising Tide” for Harper’s Magazine

Planning the future of a sinking island.

Maatia Toafa, the prime minister of Tuvalu, kicked off his leather sandals and crossed his bare feet on the carpet. He wore gold-rimmed glasses with tinted lenses—not the opaque tint of an African dictator but the lighter shading of a Florida retiree—and cream-colored chinos with a sharp crease…

 
 

“God Is in the Basement of the Empire State Building” for New York Magazine

Each spring, the King’s College, a Christian school occupying two floors in the Empire State Building, hosts a series of lectures and debates on a single theme. This year’s theme is villainy…

 
 

“My Summer at an Indian Call Center” for Mother Jones

Lessons learned: Americans are hotheads, Australians are drunks—and never say where you’re calling from

I stand flush against the window of a Toyota showroom, trying to stay in a shrinking sliver of shade. We’re on the cusp of midday, which, in Delhi in June, lasts most of the day and drives everyone into a languid torpor…

 
 

“John Thompson vs. American Justice” on The New Yorker Radio Hour

When police showed up to question John Thompson, he was worried that it was because he had sold drugs to an undercover cop. When he realized they were investigating a murder, he could only laugh: “Shit, for real? Murder?”